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The transformation of gay life from the closet to liberation, 1948-1980

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TitleInfo
Title
The transformation of gay life from the closet to liberation, 1948-1980
SubTitle
New York City’s gay markets as a study in late capitalism
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mitchell
NamePart (type = given)
Christopher Adam
NamePart (type = date)
1980-
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Christopher Adam Mitchell
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
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Livingston
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James
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James Livingston
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Isenberg
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Alison
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Alison Isenberg
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lears
NamePart (type = given)
T.J. Jackson
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T.J. Jackson Lears
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Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Escoffier
NamePart (type = given)
Jeffrey
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Jeffrey Escoffier
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
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outside member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mumford
NamePart (type = given)
Kevin
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Kevin Mumford
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
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outside member
Name (type = corporate)
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
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2015
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2015-01
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2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation argues for the historical significance of markets, information, and the politics of queer consumption to the transformation of queer subjectivity and social life in the postwar era from the closet to Gay Liberation in New York City. My dissertation situates this history of transformation and mobilization within a period of broad shifts from a manufacturing, industrial-based economy to a service and information economy based on cultural production. In this context, I argue that the queer economy’s provision of social space, information (including new forms of cultural representation), and identities should be understood as an exemplary feature of late capitalism. Using the frameworks of institutional economics and economic history, urban history, and queer theory, this dissertation explores two distinct phases of the queer economy and the ways in which legal regulations and cultural norms convened and constrained queer markets, consumer culture, and the politics of identity. The first phase of the queer economy, from the late 1940s to the late 1960s, was essentially organized as an illicit and stigmatized market, to which queer consumers responded with cultural patterns based on concealment and evasion, or what Jeffrey Escoffier refers to as the segregation of public and private information characteristic of the “double life.” The second phase of the queer economy, from the late 1960s until about 1980, was characterized by decriminalization and destigmatization of queer markets, consumer and entrepreneurial activism and direct engagement with local politics, and the dynamics of gentrification. Central to the transition from the closet economy to the economy of Gay Liberation was the cultural production of information, including pop psychology and sociology, pulp novels, gossip columns and tabloid literature, Homophile publications, gay guides, and records of gay businesses and gay business associations. This dissertation explores this archive in order to show both the quantitative increase in information (and therefore public knowledge) about homosexuality and queer social life, as well as the qualitative shift in information, much of it produced by queers themselves, that repudiated the logic of criminalization and stigmatization and anticipated the mass “coming out” and political demands of Gay Liberation.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
History
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Gay liberation movement--New York (State)--New York
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Capitalism--New York (State)--New York
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6177
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xii, 476 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Christopher Adam Mitchell
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T37P914S
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Mitchell
GivenName
Christopher
MiddleName
Adam
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-01-07 12:28:46
AssociatedEntity
Name
Christopher Mitchell
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2016-01-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after January 31st, 2016.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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ETD
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windows xp
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