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World language teacher preparation and special education

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TitleInfo
Title
World language teacher preparation and special education
SubTitle
a case study
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Greer
NamePart (type = given)
David G.
NamePart (type = date)
1979-
DisplayForm
David G. Greer
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mangual Figueroa
NamePart (type = given)
Ariana
DisplayForm
Ariana Mangual Figueroa
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Flores
NamePart (type = given)
Nydia
DisplayForm
Nydia Flores
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mayer
NamePart (type = given)
Matthew
DisplayForm
Matthew Mayer
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Education
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
World language classrooms in the State of New Jersey are witnessing the enrollment of more students with special needs due to federal regulations requiring public school districts to make all classrooms more inclusive of students with varying levels of physical, cognitive, behavioral, and academic needs. With a push for inclusion in general education classrooms, more students with learning disabilities (LD) are enrolling in courses of world language teachers who have not traditionally had opportunities to work with students with special needs. Research focused on creating methodologies for teaching world languages, specifically for students with LD, has been sparse (Hu 2003; and Reed & Stansfield, 2004). This study investigated the ways that pre-service teachers were being prepared to work with students with LD in world language classrooms. In addition, the study investigated the policies and practices that shape world language teacher preparation program models as well as the ways that graduates from one specific program believed that they were prepared to work with students with LD. A university that allowed students to enroll in a single or dual-track program leading to endorsement in a world language and/or teacher of students with disabilities was the focal site of this investigation. Participants in this two-year case study included pre-service teachers and their cooperating teachers, recent graduates, partner school administrators, and multiple administrators, professors, and staff members at the focal university. Data from interviews and observations were analyzed qualitatively to examine the perceived preparation teachers received compared with their experiences in the preparation program. The study demonstrated that the dual-endorsement program provided teachers with coursework and experiences that helped them to grow in their understanding of teaching students with LD; whereas, pre-service teachers enrolled in the single-endorsement program had little experience in working with students with LD in the classroom upon graduation. This study is significant because it contributes to the field of world language teacher preparation and special education by highlighting some of the practices that led participants to feel more confident in working with students with LD in world language classrooms. The study addresses the existing gap in research on pre-service teachers through a presentation of three findings: first, cooperating teachers help shape pre-service teachers’ attitudes towards inclusion; second, the single-track endorsement program is not preparing pre-service world language teachers to work in inclusive settings; and third, personal experiences and relationships foster collaborative efforts between world language and special education teachers.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Language Education
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Teachers--Training of
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Language and languages--Study and teaching
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Special education
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6243
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (x, 281 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by David G. Greer
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001500001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3C53NP6
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Greer
GivenName
David
MiddleName
G.
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-04-13 09:10:01
AssociatedEntity
Name
David Greer
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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