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Heritage improved

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TitleInfo
Title
Heritage improved
SubTitle
postcolonial cinema adapts the nineteenth-century British novel
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kao
NamePart (type = given)
Vivian Yuan
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
DisplayForm
Vivian Yuan Kao
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sadoff
NamePart (type = given)
Dianne F.
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Dianne F. Sadoff
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kucich
NamePart (type = given)
John
DisplayForm
John Kucich
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mangharam
NamePart (type = given)
Mukti Lakhi
DisplayForm
Mukti Lakhi Mangharam
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sen
NamePart (type = given)
Meheli
DisplayForm
Meheli Sen
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation brings cinematic adaptation to bear on the question of how nineteenth-century imperial ideologies of “improvement” continue to inform power inequalities in a global capitalist age. Not simply the promotion of general betterment for all, improvement in the British colonial context licensed a superior “master race” to “uplift” its colonized populations, morally, socially, and economically. The project argues that, on the one hand, adaptations reveal the coercion and arrogance that underpin contemporary notions of development, humanitarianism, and modernity—improvement’s post-Victorian guises. On the other hand, the films also use their colonial-era source texts to criticize these same legacies of imperialism. By bringing together cinematic adaptation and postcolonial studies—two fields that rarely converse—I demonstrate that adaptation, as both method and cultural product, provides a new direction for postcolonial criticism. The adaptations I examine represent postcolonial, British, and American films that relocate and update the plotlines of classic novels to postcolonial societies in the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. These films detect not only the persistence of the Enlightenment ideology of improvement and its imperial manifestations, but also the critiques of improvement ideology in their source texts that can be used to challenge that ideology in its new forms. I trace the development of improvement discourse’s main assumptions, specifically its conceptions of temporality and spatiality, as they merged with early English capitalism, and then how they influenced British imperial policy after the major indigenous revolutions of the 1850s and 1860s. Each chapter demonstrates that British fiction provides useful strategies of resistance against the improvement ideology that continues to structure postcolonial realities. Pairing Jane Austen’s novels with Bollywood adaptations and Jane Eyre with Jacques Tourneur’s wartime thriller, I Walked with a Zombie, I claim that improvement ideology’s alignment with capitalist values informs post-independence notions of economic development in India and the West Indies. Pairing Rudyard Kipling’s and John Huston’s versions of The Man Who Would Be King and Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles with Michael Winterbottom’s Trishna, I claim that Victorian self-improvement—and its inextricability from the forced development of colonized populations—underlies Anglo-American notions of conquest and modernity well into the twenty-first century.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Literatures in English
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
English literature
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Criticism--England--History
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Postcolonialism in literature
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6246
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vii, 250 p.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Vivian Yuan Kao
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3Q52RGG
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Kao
GivenName
Vivian
MiddleName
Yuan
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-04-02 15:46:27
AssociatedEntity
Name
Vivian Kao
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2017-05-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 30th, 2017.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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