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Diversity stigma and diversity credits

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TitleInfo
Title
Diversity stigma and diversity credits
SubTitle
the positive and negative consequences of race and gender diversity for companies and employees
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wilton
NamePart (type = given)
Leigh Solano
NamePart (type = date)
1981-
DisplayForm
Leigh Solano Wilton
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sanchez
NamePart (type = given)
Diana T
DisplayForm
Diana T Sanchez
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Aiello
NamePart (type = given)
John R
DisplayForm
John R Aiello
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wilder
NamePart (type = given)
David
DisplayForm
David Wilder
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Unzueta
NamePart (type = given)
Miguel M.
DisplayForm
Miguel M. Unzueta
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Many U.S. institutions have committed to increasing employee diversity as a means to improve their organizational strength and competitiveness, and frequently highlight the race and gender diversity at their organizations in promotional materials such as brochures and websites. However, recent research suggests that exposure to both race and gender diversity systems at the organizational level may be associated with negative consequences such as discriminatory hiring for racial minorities and women (Kaiser et al., 2013). Thus, corporations that espouse their race and gender diversity may ironically harm themselves and the underrepresented group members whom they seek to empower (i.e., racial minorities and women). At the same time, race and gender diversity has been associated with positive outcomes for companies, such as creativity, so individuals may also expect diverse organizations to also possess these qualities. This dissertation examined the perceptions and downstream consequences of race and gender diversity in institutional settings among high status group members (Whites, White men). Study 1a predicted and found that race-diverse organizations experienced diversity stigma, being evaluated as less prestigious, less exclusive, and having less competent employees, compared to a race-homogenous organization. In contrast Study 1b found that gender-diverse organizations experienced diversity credits, being evaluated as more broadminded, marginally more prestigious, and having more competent employees, compared to a gender-homogenous organization. These data suggest that the perceptual benefits of diversity may remain reserved for organizations that are gender-diverse, and that race-diverse organizations may bear the perceptual brunt of organizational stigma. Studies 2a and 2b further examined whether race and gender diversity also negatively impacts the hiring and valuing of racial minorities and women, due to the perception that race or gender representation “is no longer a problem” at such organizations. Across studies, racial minorities, as well as (White) male and female candidates, received perceptual boosts in race and gender diverse contexts, though the benefits of gender diversity were more global than those of race diversity. Perception of social progress was found to be unrelated to target evaluations. The results are discussed with respect to increasing the representation and valuation of underrepresented group members in the workplace.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Diversity in the workplace
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Psychology, Industrial
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Personnel management
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6240
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (viii, 81 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Leigh Solano Wilton
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3T72K9S
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Wilton
GivenName
Leigh
MiddleName
Solano
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-03-31 13:01:21
AssociatedEntity
Name
Leigh Wilton
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2017-05-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 30th, 2017.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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