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Genocide education in Cambodia

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TitleInfo
Title
Genocide education in Cambodia
SubTitle
local initiatives, global connections
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Dy
NamePart (type = given)
Khamboly
NamePart (type = date)
1981-
DisplayForm
Khamboly Dy
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hinton
NamePart (type = given)
Alexander
DisplayForm
Alexander Hinton
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Coicaud
NamePart (type = given)
Jean-Marc
DisplayForm
Jean-Marc Coicaud
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ciorciari
NamePart (type = given)
John
DisplayForm
John Ciorciari
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Chalk
NamePart (type = given)
Frank
DisplayForm
Frank Chalk
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The content and pedagogy of genocide education in Cambodia has been effectively connected to the changing patterns of the country’s political regimes. This relationship clearly demonstrates the link between history, politics and pedagogical practices in schools. Not only do history and national politics shape the way the Cambodian genocide is taught, but the teaching is also influenced by the flows of global education philosophies in general and certain segments of global genocide education ideas and strategies in particular. This dissertation primarily asks two core questions: In what ways do history and national political changes determine the ways Cambodia teaches about the genocide? In what way does Cambodian genocide education adopt and adapt global genocide education practices? Responding to these two primary questions, the dissertation examines how history and political changes in Cambodia bring about the changes in the statuses of its genocide education. Further, the dissertation explores the local initiatives and global connections that help in mainstreaming Cambodian genocide education. From this perspective, the dissertation examines how global genocide education practices have manifested, vernacularized, transmitted and circulated into the context of Cambodia. The dissertation argues that the prevailing national political developments have constrained, or at certain junctures dictated, the content of Cambodian genocide education: the way teachers convey messages in the classrooms; the choices of historical content; the methods used to teach about the genocide; and the way people view, discuss and debate the Khmer Rouge (KR) period. Based on the theory of vernacularization developed by Peggy Levitt and Sally Merry, the dissertation further argues that global genocide education practices find their way into Cambodia and influence and intersect with local genocide education initiatives through a vernacularization process in which global ideas and strategies are translated, appropriated and harmonized with the local context and culture. These intertwined global-local genocide education practices provide overall parameters for the approach to be taken and are applied to a variety of relevant teaching models and materials that enrich the existing local genocide education content. Theoretically, the dissertation research contributes to an understanding of global genocide education in general and Cambodian experiences in particular, as well as to an understanding of how globalization and localization function in this important area of education. In particular, the dissertation contributes to an understanding of how and why certain dominant global genocide education practices have arisen in genocide education efforts around the globe; how and why these dominant global practices have affected genocide education in post-conflict Cambodia; and how and why local Cambodian initiatives have adopted, modified and reconciled those dominant global genocide education practices to adapt to the local educational contexts and the local country conditions. It also shows how the choice to adopt particular features of prevailing dominant global practices has great consequences for the local genocide education programs and their social impacts. The dissertation uses multiple research methods including qualitative study (semi-structured interviews), archival research, secondary research, and classroom observations in order to provide both comprehensive and in-depth analyses.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Global Affairs
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6497
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xiv, 354 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Genocide--History
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Cambodia--Politics and government
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Political atrocities--Cambodia
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Khamboly Dy
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T31J9CPV
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Dy
GivenName
Khamboly
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-05-01 19:34:51
AssociatedEntity
Name
Khamboly Dy
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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