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Complex place and place identity

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TitleInfo
Title
Complex place and place identity
Name (type = personal)
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Danis
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Nicholas Stephen
NamePart (type = date)
1986-
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Nicholas Stephen Danis
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author
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Akinbiyi
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Akinbiyi Akinlabi
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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de Lacy
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Paul
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Paul de Lacy
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Tesar
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Bruce
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Bruce Tesar
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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NamePart (type = family)
Prince
NamePart (type = given)
Alan
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Alan Prince
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Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Padgett
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Jaye
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Jaye Padgett
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Advisory Committee
Role
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
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NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
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DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
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2017-10
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2017
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation proposes a unified theory of Place Identity to model interactions of phonological place features along local, long-distance, and input/output dimensions. Empirical support comes from reduction and agreement processes involving complex, or multiple, place on a single segment---processes previously reported to be unattested. Identity constraints (Ident and Agree) are those that demand two segments be alike with respect to the presence or value of some feature, and are constructed here following a schema of Generalized Identity. The resulting constraints vary both in the relation of the segments in question (input/output correspondence, surface correspondence, or strict adjacency) and in the location of place features in the geometry (within-category or cross-category). Sets of stringently-defined constraints are built via Constraint Summation, a constraint-building operation that sums the violation profiles of the original constraints. The resulting system of place identity captures partial class effects (based on Padgett 2002) of place along all identity dimensions, while augmenting the observations in de Lacy 2006 on markedness reduction and inventory structure with respect to complex segments. Empirical investigation of complex segments reveals place behavior unattested with simple stops. In Ngbaka, place co-occurrence restrictions are an example of long-distance major place harmony, which requires place identity over surface correspondence in the Agreement by Correspondence framework (Rose & Walker 2004, a.o.). The patterns are supported by a statistical analysis of a newly-digitized Ngbaka dictionary. Additionally, in Vietnamese and Aghem, a back, round vowel causes a change in consonantal place on an adjacent consonant, forming a labial-velar stop in both instances. This otherwise unattested type of cross-category interaction provides additional evidence for a unified theory of place features (following Clements & Hume 1995), to which place identity constraints crucially refer. Lastly, complex segments shed a place feature when undergoing markedness reduction instead of reducing to the least marked place (cf. de Lacy 2006). These processes are supported by an empirical survey, and show that place identity must count each place disparity. The resulting grammatical system is powerful enough to determine targets of reduction for complex segments without additional representational devices while restrictive enough to not overgenerate patterns for simple place reduction.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Linguistics
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Phonology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8473
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xvii, 231 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Nicholas Stephen Danis
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TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38055PH
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Danis
GivenName
Nicholas
MiddleName
Stephen
Role
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RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-10-01 15:40:16
AssociatedEntity
Name
Nicholas Danis
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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2018-01-18T16:52:12
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