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A right to leviathan

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TitleInfo
Title
A right to leviathan
SubTitle
grassroots politics in the city of palaces
Name (type = personal)
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Gerlofs
NamePart (type = given)
Ben Alan
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Ben Alan Gerlofs
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author
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Lake
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Robert
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Robert Lake
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Ghertner
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D. Asher
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D. Asher Ghertner
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Advisory Committee
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co-chair
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Newman
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Kathe
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Kathe Newman
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Mitchell
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Don
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Don Mitchell
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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school
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theses
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2017
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2017-10
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2017
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation examines the growth and development of contemporary Mexico City from the Mexican Revolution through the present. The twentieth century birthed two Mexican ‘monsters’, I argue, the PRI—the ‘ruling party’ that dominated Mexican politics for roughly seven decades until its ouster in 2000—and the capital, Mexico City. I pay special attention to the relationship between these two leviathans as they struggled through a century of revolutionary changes. An historical exploration of this relationship yields three interrelated conflictual trajectories, each of which receives in turn a more targeted investigation through specific cases. I explore the first of these, the city’s proliferating environmental, political, social, economic, and other crises, most of an increasingly dire character, through an examination of the history of ‘the right to the city’ in Mexico City from its earliest conceptualizations in the late 1980s though the public endorsement of the Mexico City Charter for the Right to the City in 2010. My investigation moves through the second trajectory, the troubled path of democratization and party politics in the capital city, by way of a largely ethnographic engagement with a planned redevelopment project along one of the city’s historic boulevards, Avenida Chapultepec. I follow the third trajectory, the growing tension between the city and the national state and the PRI—which appears in several distinct manifestations—through an historical reconstruction of the decades-long processes of ‘political reform’ by which the city finally achieved its political “emancipation” in January of 2016, and an 2 ethnographic exploration of the contemporary social and political context surrounding these ideas and events. Taken together, the cases here considered contribute several significant conclusions and open up several new avenues for the study of urban political geography. My approach to dialectical investigation provides a basis for innovative methodological and empirical considerations, not least in the way of political imaginaries elaborated in pursuit of radical change and the potential implications thereof. The plural and shifting meanings of revolution in Mexico City, the process of battling seemingly incontestable hegemonies, and the dangers and benefits of grassroots social and political movements forging partnerships with political parties or arms of the state all likewise hold potentially pathbreaking insights for the study of the character and pace of urban political change.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Geography
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
Identifier
ETD_8379
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 261 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Mexico--Mexico City--Politics and government
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Ben Alan Gerlofs
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3CF9T61
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Gerlofs
GivenName
Ben
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Type
Permission or license
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2017-09-21 20:15:40
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Name
Ben Gerlofs
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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