Staff View
Characterization of sensory-motor behavior under cognitive load

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Characterization of sensory-motor behavior under cognitive load
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ryu
NamePart (type = given)
Ji Hye
DisplayForm
Ji Hye Ryu
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Torres
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth
DisplayForm
Elizabeth Torres
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2017-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This thesis introduces a new experimental paradigm and offers a unifying statistical framework to characterize possible interdependencies among signals of the nervous systems through three proposed fundamentally different types of processes. We have coined the terms deliberate, spontaneous and inevitable for these processes. Deliberate processes manifest through overt movements executed during goal-directed actions (e.g., when instructed to point to a visual target). They are systematic in nature, and are well characterized by low variability and robustness to changes in bodily physical dynamics. Spontaneous processes manifest through highly automatic and covert movements, that are uninstructed and goal-less (e.g., retracting the hand from a visual target), and are characterized by high variability and susceptibility to environmental cues and changes in bodily motion dynamics. These processes occur largely beneath the person’s awareness, but can be brought up to conscious control when instructed to do so. They co-exist with, and are incidental to the goal-directed segments of complex motions, as they provide fluidity to behavior at large. The inevitable processes are generated by autonomic activities such as the heartbeat. They have a narrower range of change in dynamics and cannot be volitionally controlled or be perturbed by environmental cues, unlike the deliberate and spontaneous processes. These processes are robust and provide a unique signature of the person’s nervous systems. Here, we study these processes in tandem as participants perform a basic pointing task with different levels of cognitive load in the context of decision making. We assess the continuous somatic-motor performance of the nervous system through a personalized statistical analysis of the moment-by-moment fluctuations in the amplitude and timing of various biophysical parameters. These include variations in the amplitude of the angular acceleration peaks and their inter-peak interval timing, and variation in the inter-heartbeat-interval timings (IBI). We find that the interdependency is funneled out through one of the processes depending on the demands of the task. Tasks with differing levels of cognitive load manifest the interdependency through inevitable processes with shifts in the IBI stochastic signatures. Decision-making (a form of cognitive load) manifests the interdependency through deliberate processes with fluctuations in the amplitude of the angular acceleration peaks, and through spontaneous processes with the inter-peak interval variations. We emphasize that these findings do not refer to discrete mouse-clicks or verbally reported data. They are rather in reference to continuous physiological data harnessed from the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. As such, our methods are novel to the field of cognitive psychology. We discuss our results along with possible applications of this paradigm to basic science and clinical practices. Specifically, we invite their use in expanding the analytical tools for the nascent field of embodied cognition, and suggest these metrics to be used as dynamic outcome measures of voluntary, automatic, and autonomic control in clinical settings.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8391
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (viii, 59 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Cognition
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Motor ability
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Jihye Ryu
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3J1069X
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Ryu
GivenName
Ji Hye
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-09-23 21:28:19
AssociatedEntity
Name
Ji Hye Ryu
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
CreatingApplication
Version
1.4
ApplicationName
Mac OS X 10.11.6 Quartz PDFContext
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-09-23T16:25:40
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-09-23T16:25:40
Back to the top
Version 8.4.8
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2022