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Communicative designs for input solicitation during organizational change

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TitleInfo
Title
Communicative designs for input solicitation during organizational change
SubTitle
implications for providers’ communicative perceptions and decisions
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sahay
NamePart (type = given)
Surabhi
NamePart (type = date)
1985-
DisplayForm
Surabhi Sahay
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lewis
NamePart (type = given)
Laurie
DisplayForm
Laurie Lewis
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Scott
NamePart (type = given)
Craig
DisplayForm
Craig Scott
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mikesell
NamePart (type = given)
Lisa
DisplayForm
Lisa Mikesell
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Barge
NamePart (type = given)
Kavin
DisplayForm
Kavin Barge
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2017-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Organizational change is a prevalent phenomenon in our society. During change, input is solicited from stakeholders and lower level employees often as a way to lower resistance and uncertainty due to change. However, little is known about the specific manner in which input is solicited and used. This study uses a case study approach to investigate the beneficial and problematic features of the architecture of input solicitation and explores ways in which designs for soliciting input are managed and negotiated by multiple stakeholders. These designs have various implications and consequences for stakeholders and the organization. The study is conducted with nurses in a medical center regarding their provision of input in the Magnet initiative-- a credential that recognizes organizations with excellence in nursing work. The study answered research questions regarding a) beneficial and problematic design features of input solicitation, b) differences in perceptions of those charged with soliciting input, c) management of input solicitation by design teams, and d) differences in how individuals from various levels of the organization influence solicitation designs. The study conducted 39 semi-structured interviews and one questionnaire with 125 respondents. Additionally, the researcher was able to observe three change related meetings. This investigation led to a number of important findings. First several designable features were found to be beneficial and problematic for participation from multi-stakeholder perspective. In addition to these features, the findings also suggest the role of change specific features and other long-standing features in influencing participation. Second, it was found that not all individuals charged with collecting input viewed solicitation designs in the same way. Third, implementers designed several features collectively to manage input solicitation through proactive and emergent designs. Last, a grounded practical theory analysis revealed that individuals from each level of the organization focused on different problem aspects during input solicitation and modified the techniques to fit their needs, which had several implications for the organization and the stakeholders.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Communication, Information and Library Studies
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8235
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 227 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Organizational change
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Surabhi Sahay
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T34Q7Z4M
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
CreatingApplication
Version
1.4
ApplicationName
Mac OS X 10.9.5 Quartz PDFContext
DateCreated (point = start); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-06-29T19:10:20
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-06-29T19:10:20
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