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The general cognitive ability of mice has moderate heritability and is influenced by environmental factors

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Title
The general cognitive ability of mice has moderate heritability and is influenced by environmental factors
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sauce Silva
NamePart (type = given)
Bruno
NamePart (type = date)
1984-
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Bruno Sauce Silva
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Matzel
NamePart (type = given)
Louis D.
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Louis D. Matzel
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Selby
NamePart (type = given)
Edward
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Edward Selby
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Shors
NamePart (type = given)
Tracey
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Tracey Shors
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Chabris
NamePart (type = given)
Christopher
DisplayForm
Christopher Chabris
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
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school
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Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2018
DateOther (type = degree); (qualifier = exact)
2018-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Among humans, estimates of the heritability of intelligence are high, although there is also evidence that this trait is quite malleable. However, little is known about the genotypes and environmental states that are relevant to intelligence, much less how they react together. This is in part due to limitations on work with humans, which are largely confined to assessing heritability and malleability using only correlational methods. In the past, our group has developed a battery of cognitive tasks in mice where the performance of individuals is correlated across all tests. Aggregate performance on this battery of tests predicts individuals’ performance on other cognitive abilities implicated in human general intelligence such as reasoning and working memory. Thus it has been asserted that the “general cognitive ability” (GCA) scores obtained in this battery are analogous to human IQ scores. Here we attempted to answer a critical question: How much the individual differences in mouse intelligence can be influenced by genetics and the environment? To make these determinations, we used a strategy analogous to classic human twin/adoption studies. Unlike human studies, in the present case, different environments were under experimental control and thus could be administered differently to different members of sibling cohorts. We used 232 outbred male mice consisting of 58 families of 4 full siblings (fraternal twins) and provided different environments to the siblings from each family (analogous to “twins raised apart”). For the environmental manipulation, half of the sibling groups stayed in a standard colony room with little stimulation, while the other half of the siblings were exposed to environments that are prone to influence cognitive development: physical exercise and daily exposure to novel experiences. Similar to our previous work, here GCA (i.e., intelligence) accounted for 19.5% of the common variance in mice’s performance from an exploratory factor analysis. We found that GCA was moderately malleable, with environmental enrichment increasing GCA scores by 0.44 standard deviations. In humans, this increase would represent an increase of 6.6 IQ points. Although here we used a combination of environmental factors that were likely to be effective, these were admittedly limited in scope and strength, and so GCA can potentially be more malleable than these results suggest. The population of all mice combined showed a GCA heritability of 0.24, quite comparable to values estimated by others in rodents and non-human primates. To our surprise, our Enrichment group had a heritability not significantly different from zero, while our Control group had a moderate heritability of 0.55. This is the opposite of what is typically found in humans, where heritability is higher in populations drawn from higher SES environments. Also, unexpectedly, we did not find evidence for G×E in our study. The results from the current study could help laying the groundwork for future studies on the independent effects and interactions between environment and genes in shaping general intelligence in humans.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8610
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 74 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Cognition
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Bruno Sauce Silva
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3F47SB5
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Sauce Silva
GivenName
Bruno
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-01-03 13:39:27
AssociatedEntity
Name
Bruno Sauce Silva
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
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License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2018-01-03T13:38:14
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2018-01-03T13:38:14
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