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U.S. citizen children in immigrant families

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TitleInfo
Title
U.S. citizen children in immigrant families
SubTitle
effects of state laws on social safety net enrollment
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Twersky
NamePart (type = given)
Sylvia
NamePart (type = date)
1973-
DisplayForm
Sylvia Twersky
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Monheit
NamePart (type = given)
Alan
DisplayForm
Alan Monheit
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Grafova
NamePart (type = given)
Irina
DisplayForm
Irina Grafova
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
co-chair
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2018
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2018-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Background: Laws that constrain eligibility for social safety net programs can have the unintended consequence of discouraging eligible citizens from enrolling. This “chilling effect” of laws at the federal level such as the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), has been previously established by the literature. At the state level, there are an increasing number of restrictive laws using immigration status as an inclusion or exclusion criteria. There has also been an increase in the number of citizen children in the United States that are part of immigrant families, and these children are more likely to be living in poverty or near poverty, experience food hardship, be uninsured, and be in poor health than their counterparts in native families. However, there is little research that has looked at whether these state laws also create an unintended chilling effect on U.S. citizen children in immigrant families. Therefore, this series of studies is designed to test whether restrictive immigration-related state laws passed during 2000 to 2008 had a chilling effect on enrollment in Medicaid, SCHIP, and food stamp benefits by eligible immigrant families where at least one child is a U.S. citizen. Twenty states were chosen for these studies based on their large immigrant population as a percent of the total state population or because of substantial immigrant population growth over the time period of the analysis. Aims: The specific aims of these three studies are to: 1) Characterize demographic, economic, and political drivers of state adoption of these restrictive laws. These factors can both be used to address policy endogeneity in studies two and three, and offer insight for state level immigrant advocates. 2) Identify whether there is a negative effect of state level restrictive laws on the enrollment in public insurance of U.S. citizen in immigrants’ families. Identify additional factors such as citizenship that may interact with state laws to create lower enrollment for eligible children in immigrant families compared to native families. 3) Understand if there is a chilling effect of restrictive state laws that may lead to lower enrollment in food stamp benefits for immigrant families in a restrictive state policy environment compared to similar families not impacted by these laws. Results: The first study identified two state economic factors, net revenue and unemployment rates, two demographic factors, the state population’s education level and percent of immigrants that are not citizens, and political congruence in the state governing bodies as drivers behind state adoption of restrictive laws. State restrictive laws created a chilling effect that reduced uptake of Medicaid/CHIP among U.S. citizen children in immigrant families compared to children in native families. There was also an identified impact of the mother’s citizenship on child enrollment. No chilling effect was observed for family food stamp enrollment. However, independent of state laws, immigrant families were less likely to enroll in food stamp benefits compared to their native counterparts.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Public Health
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8705
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (x, 199 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Immigrants--United States
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
United States--Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Welfare recipients--United States
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Sylvia E. Twersky
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3P272K3
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Twersky
GivenName
Sylvia
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-03-14 17:26:16
AssociatedEntity
Name
Sylvia Twersky
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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2018-03-19T13:19:51
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2018-03-19T13:25:02
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