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Mass spectrometric determination of photolytic decomposition products of UV-photoinitiators and migration studies of UV-photoinitiators and decomposition products in food packaging

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TitleInfo
Title
Mass spectrometric determination of photolytic decomposition products of UV-photoinitiators and migration studies of UV-photoinitiators and decomposition products in food packaging
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Scarsella
NamePart (type = given)
Joseph B.
NamePart (type = date)
1994-
DisplayForm
Joseph B. Scarsella
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hartman
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas G
DisplayForm
Thomas G Hartman
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Schaich
NamePart (type = given)
Karen
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Karen Schaich
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
HO
NamePart (type = given)
CHI-TANG
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CHI-TANG HO
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
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2019
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-05
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2019
Language
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English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Resins in inks, coatings, and adhesives in food packaging are increasingly cured by UV radiation of photo-initiators (PI’s) with minimal energy requirements and without environmentally unfriendly solvents. When exposed to UV light, PI’s produce free radicals that catalyze polymerization of reactive monomers and pre-polymers into resins. PI’s and their photolytic decomposition products do not polymerize during curing but remain as residuals that can migrate into foods stored therein, becoming unintentional food additives. As interest in additive toxicity has increased, food safety organizations worldwide have developed regulations to monitor migration of these substances from food packaging. While intact PI's have been investigated, research on formation and migration of PI photolytic decomposition products is sparse.
This research characterized and quantified decomposition products of twenty-four PI's commonly used in food packaging. UV-photoinitiators were applied as films onto aluminum foil disks, UV-irradiated using an energy level representing the upper limit typically used in commercial production (125-150 millijoules), and extracted from the foil. Structure and contents of migrating compounds were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and direct mass spectrometry, and tentative mechanisms of formation were proposed. Non-irradiated photoinitiator standards were analyzed as controls.
In total, 107 photolytic decomposition products were identified, 93 of which have not been previously reported as photolytic decomposition products of UV-photoinitiators. This compilation of PI decomposition products will aid industry in the tracing of the sources of compounds identified in migration testing of food packaging materials.
To assess the frequency and extent of migration of PI’s and photolytic decomposition products in actual products, migration data from 258 UV-cure food packaging samples analyzed in previous studies were re-examined. Migration of PI’s or their photolytic decomposition products was detected in all samples tested. Most commonly observed PI’s: Darocur 1173 (139/258 samples, max 1557 ng/cm2) and benzophenone (88/258 samples, max 948 ng/cm2). Most commonly observed decomposition products: 2,4,6-trimethylbenzaldehyde from (2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)-phosphine oxide (TPO) (130/258 samples, max 1938 ng/cm2) and 1-phenyl-2-butanone from Irgacure 369 (83/258 samples, max 441 ng/cm2).
These results show the importance of tracking PI photodecomposition products migrating from food packaging and provide a base for developing analytical libraries to identify them.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Photoinitiators
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Food Science
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Food -- Packaging -- Biodegradation
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Ultraviolet radiation
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_9558
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xvi, 325 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-380j-r669
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Scarsella
GivenName
Joseph
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-02-13 12:28:39
AssociatedEntity
Name
Joseph Scarsella
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2019-02-15T11:27:52
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2019-02-15T11:27:04
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Microsoft: Print To PDF
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