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Microscale patterning of osteogenic response and mineralization on PEGDA hydrogels

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TitleInfo
Title
Microscale patterning of osteogenic response and mineralization on PEGDA hydrogels
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
White
NamePart (type = given)
Kristopher A.
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Kristopher A. White
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author
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Olabisi
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Ronke M.
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Ronke M. Olabisi
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Roth
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Charles M.
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Charles M. Roth
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shreiber
NamePart (type = given)
David I.
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David I. Shreiber
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fritton
NamePart (type = given)
J. Christopher
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J. Christopher Fritton
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Advisory Committee
Role
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outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
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DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019
DateOther (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-05
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2019
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English
Abstract
Global increases in life expectancy are accompanied by an increasing need for bone tissue regeneration. The gold standard for bone repair is the autologous graft (autograft), which enjoys excellent clinical outcomes. However, the autograft suffers from significant drawbacks including donor site morbidity and limited availability. Although collagen sponges delivered with bone morphogenetic protein, type 2 (BMP-2) are a common alternative or supplement to grafts, they do not efficiently retain BMP-2, necessitating extremely high doses to elicit bone formation. As a result, reports of BMP-2 complications are on the rise, including the promotion of cancer and ectopic bone formation, the latter of which induces complications such as breathing difficulties and neurologic impairments. Therefore, efforts to exert spatial control over bone formation are of particular interest. Using the tissue engineering paradigm of scaffolds, biological factors, and cells, several studies have demonstrated the potential of this approach to elicit targeted and controlled bone formation. These approaches include biomaterial scaffolds derived from synthetic sources such as calcium phosphates or polymers, natural sources such as bone or seashell, and biofactors such as BMP-2 that are immobilized within the scaffolds. Although BMP-2 is the only protein clinically approved for use in a surgical device, there are several proteins, small molecules, and naturally derived osteogenic growth factors that show promise in tissue engineering applications. This dissertation presents research directed at achieving control over the location and onset of bone formation (spatiotemporal control) for tissue engineered bone towards avoiding the current complications associated with BMP-2.

Spatiotemporal control over tissue formation is relatively unreported in literature, particularly microspatial control. The first aim of this work seeks elucidate the mineralization capacity of osteogenic growth factors covalently tethered to a substrate via a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker. This was accomplished by PEGylating growth factors and covalently tethering them to acrylated glass substrates. The results of this study indicated that PEGylated WSM can induce mineralization in acellular solution. Further, the results reveal the presence of sub-micron features within the mineralized matrix. Further work in this dissertation sought elucidate the relationship between cellular and acellular osteogenesis and mineralization induced by osteogenic growth factors. The initial hypothesis was that growth factors capable of directing acellular nucleation would demonstrate the ability to microspatially direct cell-mediated osteogenesis and mineralization. The results revealed that both PEGylated BMP-2 and nacre WSM show some ability to direct osteogenesis when patterned onto PEGDA hydrogel substrates. These findings have broad implications on the design and development of orthopaedic interventions and drug delivery.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Nacre
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Chemical and Biochemical Engineering
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Bone regeneration
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Tissue scaffolds
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_9681
PhysicalDescription
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xvi, 127 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-wkqn-e397
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
White
GivenName
Kristopher
MiddleName
A.
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-04-04 15:51:09
AssociatedEntity
Name
Kristopher A. White
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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