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The role of Reelin after traumatic brain injury

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TitleInfo
Title
The role of Reelin after traumatic brain injury
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Dal Pozzo
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Valentina
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Valentina Dal Pozzo
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author
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D'Arcangelo
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Gabriella
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Gabriella D'Arcangelo
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Firestein
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Bonnie
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Bonnie Firestein
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Alder
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Janet
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Janet Alder
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Xie
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Ping
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Ping Xie
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019
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2019-10
Language
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English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes severe cognitive disability or death, resulting from common occurrences as car accidents, falls, high-impact sport, violence, or explosive blasts. Statistical data indicate that approximately 2 million people are affected annually by TBI Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes severe cognitive disability or death, resulting from common occurrences as car accidents, falls, high-impact sport, violence, or explosive blasts.
Statistical data indicate that approximately 2 million people are affected annually by TBI in the United States alone. Most of the time, the symptoms are evident immediately or soon after the impact. The injury results in various symptoms, such as seizures, cognitive disability, loss of memory, visual disturbances and other debilitating neurological problems. The patients require long rehabilitative treatments at a high cost for them and their families. At the moment, there are limited treatments available, and no effective cure for cognitive disability after TBI.
In this study, we investigated the potential role of the Reelin protein in neuroprotection and recovery after TBI. Reelin is a glycoprotein that regulates brain development during embryogenesis and synaptic plasticity during adult life. Reelin has been implicated in several developmental brain disorders, including epilepsy and schizophrenia, where its reduced expression may alter neuronal activity. A few studies also suggested that Reelin may play a role in the recovery after brain damage by stimulating adult neurogenesis, protecting tissue from cell death, and promoting tissue repair by restoring synaptic connectivity. In this work, we used the controlled cortical impact (CCI) technique to model TBI in the mouse brain and found that Reelin expression changes in response to the injury, especially in the hippocampus, an area of the brain that plays an important role in learning and memory. We also conducted in vitro experiments using mouse neuronal cultures and observed that exogenous Reelin protects neuronal cells from the toxicity induced by high doses of glutamate, an excitatory amino acid that increases rapidly in the extracellular space after brain injury. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that Reelin may be beneficial for neuroprotection and functional recovery after TBI. To further investigate recovery, we also performed preliminary behavioral studies in mice to establish whether CCI results in cognitive and motor deficits.
The long-term goal of this study is to firmly establish whether Reelin could be a new target for pharmacological intervention aimed at improving the quality of life for people affected by TBI.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Neuroscience
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Traumatic brain injury
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Brain -- Wounds and injuries -- Treatment
RelatedItem (type = host)
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Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD_10355
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1 online resource (x, 117 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-na7d-9e29
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Dal Pozzo
GivenName
Valentina
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = start); (qualifier = exact)
2019-09-27 14:22:29
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Name
Valentina Dal Pozzo
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = start)
2020-04-29
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = end)
2021-10-31
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author’s request. It will be publicly available after October 31, 2021.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2019-10-01T14:26:15
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2019-10-01T14:26:15
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