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Investigation of Epichloë festucae -- strong creeping red fescue mutualistic and antagonistic interaction

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Title
Investigation of Epichloë festucae -- strong creeping red fescue mutualistic and antagonistic interaction
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wang
NamePart (type = given)
Ruying
NamePart (type = date)
1989-
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Ruying Wang
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
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Belanger
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Faith C
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Faith C Belanger
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Clarke
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Bruce B
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Bruce B Clarke
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Advisory Committee
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co-chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
White
NamePart (type = given)
James F
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James F White
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Warnke
NamePart (type = given)
Scott E
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Scott E Warnke
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
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2019
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2019-10
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2019
Language
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English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Many cool-season grasses have symbiotic relationships with Epichloë (Ascomycota, Clavicipitaceae) fungal endophytes that reside in the intercellular spaces of the above-ground parts of host plants. The presence of the Epichloë endophytes is generally beneficial to host plants due to enhanced tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses conferred by the endophytes. Many Epichloë spp. are asexual and those infections always remain asymptomatic. However, some Epichloë spp. have a sexual stage and produce macroscopic fruiting bodies (stromata) that envelop the developing inflorescences causing a syndrome termed “choke disease”. To better understand this antagonistic association, a transcriptome analysis of fungal and plant genes was performed to compare stroma tissue and asymptomatic inflorescence tissue of Epichloë festucae infected strong creeping red fescue (Festuca rubra subsp. rubra). Hundreds of fungal genes and over 10% of the plant genes were differentially expressed between the two tissue types. The differentially expressed fungal genes in the stroma tissue indicated a change in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Plant stress related genes were up-regulated in the stroma tissue suggesting the plant host was responding to the normally symbiotic fungal endophyte as a pathogen.

Genome and transcriptome analyses are often the first steps for gene discovery followed by gene function studies. CRISPR/Cas technology is a powerful molecular tool to genetically modify genes of interest for further functional characterization of those genes. Here CRISPR/Cas9 approach was utilized to knockout an E. festucae antifungal protein gene (Efe-afpA), whereas fungal transformation relying on homologous recombination was unsuccessful due to the lack of long and unique flanking regions of this gene. The mutants lacking the Efe-afpA gene were shown to have impaired growth in culture, and therefore, unlikely to form a symbiotic relationship by infecting and systematically colonizing its plant host, strong creeping red fescue. CRISPR/Cas9 approach is highly effective and precise compared to conventional homologous recombination approach. More importantly, the CRISPR/Cas9 approach is more versatile and is not restricted by the availability of long and unique homologous flanking regions of the target gene. CRISPR/Cas9 enables functional characterization of many more Epichloë genes to study the Epichloë–grass symbiosis.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Plant Biology
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Endophyte
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Epichloë -- Genetic aspects
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Red fescue -- Diseases and pests -- Genetic aspects
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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ETD_10349
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xiii, 136 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-8bfr-9n17
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Wang
GivenName
Ruying
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-09-27 15:45:35
AssociatedEntity
Name
Ruying Wang
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2021-10-30
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 30th, 2021.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2019-09-27T01:00:21
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