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The implementation of call bells and exit alarms on a psychiatric unit

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TitleInfo
Title
The implementation of call bells and exit alarms on a psychiatric unit
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bardall
NamePart (type = given)
Morgan E.
NamePart (type = date)
1986-
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Morgan E. Bardall
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author
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Garzon-Rivera
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Claudia
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Claudia Garzon-Rivera
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Advisory Committee
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co-chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Bagchi
NamePart (type = given)
Ann
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Ann Bagchi
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
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Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
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School of Nursing - RBHS
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
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2020
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2020-05
Language
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English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Purpose of Project:
Fall prevention is a long-standing challenge in many areas of healthcare. While millions have been spent to develop techniques to reduce falls for patients on medical units. This is not the case in psychiatric units. There is a severe lack in implementable research-based techniques currently used to reduce falls in psychiatric units, especially at the bedside and in the bathroom. This project implemented research-based tools that are widely used in medical units to test their effectiveness in falls reduction in psychiatric units.

Methodology:
Exit alarms and call bells were provided to patients that were considered high risk according to the psychiatric specific Wilson Sims Fall Scale. The project examined if these tools are helpful to reduce falls. It documented the effects on perceived nursing workload and on improved communication of patient needs to staff. The project was conducted in four phases: Education, Deployment, Survey, and Data analysis. The number of and location of falls during the four months before and after implementation of the intervention were compared, as well as nominal data from the reasons for eligible patients not receiving the intervention. Nominal data from the survey was also analyzed. The study examined open ended log and survey data to identify any patterns in responses.

Results:
Results of falls date showed an overall reduction of falls, but statistical significance could not be established. Falls data showed a reduction of falls in the bedroom and bathroom. Nursing Survey revealed that nurses felt that call bells and exit alarms are helpful to communicate their patients’ needs, helped to prevent patients from falling, and that both exit alarms and call bells more effective in preventing falls than either one intervention individually. Nurse were evenly split on if they felt that using call bells and exit alarms had reduced work load.

Implications for Practice:
Call bells and exit alarms in patients who are high fall risk may be effective tools, Are accepted by nurses, and there is evidence to further study them.The unit had decided to continue their use, but further expanded testing is necessary to substantiate significant results of the falls reduction. After further testing, considerations will be made to spread their use throughout the hospital system. This has the potential to save money on costly falls and reductions in reimbursement, which should also be studied in the future. Further study is needed to provide significant results that support improvements in patient care and safety with fewer falls and potential cost savings for the hospital system.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Psychiatric hospitals
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner
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Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD_10853
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (79 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
DNP
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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Title
School of Nursing (RBHS) DNP Projects
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rucore10004500001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-h7ft-q769
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Bardall
GivenName
Morgan
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2020-04-27 22:03:58
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Name
Morgan Bardall
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Nursing - RBHS
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2020-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2022-05-31
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 31st, 2022.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2020-08-11T11:44:45
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