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Spatial and volumetric distribution of organic carbon in urban tidal marsh sediments

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TitleInfo
Title
Spatial and volumetric distribution of organic carbon in urban tidal marsh sediments
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Blum
NamePart (type = given)
Julie
DisplayForm
Julie Blum
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lathrop
NamePart (type = given)
Richard G
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Richard G Lathrop
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hartman
NamePart (type = given)
Jean Marie
DisplayForm
Jean Marie Hartman
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Aronson
NamePart (type = given)
Myla
DisplayForm
Myla Aronson
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
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Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact); (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes)
2020
DateOther (type = degree); (qualifier = exact); (encoding = w3cdtf)
2020-10
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Abstract
Tidal marshes are important habitats for wildlife, and they provide a wide variety of ecosystem services, one of the most important of which is carbon storage and sequestration. Studying and modeling carbon storage in tidal marshes is very difficult due to the highly variable, highly site-specific biogeochemical processes that occur within them. Many studies attempt to understand the environmental factors that impact carbon storage in tidal marshes, but few assess marsh sediments at depths below 1 meter; therefore, this study seeks to understand the influence of environmental factors (spatial location, elevation, vegetation/sediment type) on carbon storage and to estimate total carbon stored throughout the entire depth of the marsh sediments. 16 cores were collected to refusal in a small urban tidal marsh, and percent organic carbon and organic carbon density were assessed along the full core depth. Interpolation maps of sediment thickness and carbon storage were generated to estimate total carbon stocks. Average carbon stocks were similar to those collected by previous studies, but total carbon stock estimates were over three times higher than the assessment that included the sediments above 1 meter; while studies that only assess the top meter may be useful, assessing the true depth of marsh sediments could be key to gauging the potential of tidal marshes in sequestering and storing carbon. Trajectories of percent organic matter throughout each core depth suggested that the landward portion of the study site may have vegetated first, likely as a freshwater wetland, while the seaward portion may have formed later under the influence of sea level rise and tidal regimes; as sea level gradually increased over time, the entire study site transitioned into a tidal marsh system. Surface elevation and distance from creek showed no relationship to organic matter or carbon density, while both percent organic matter and organic carbon density showed significant variation when grouped by sediment type. Percent organic matter was significantly higher in areas covered by Spartina patens than areas covered by Phragmites australis. Further research is needed to clarify the relationship between tidal marsh carbon storage and environmental factors such as sea level, tidal regimes, vegetation, elevation, spatial distribution, salinity, and other factors that may add to the complexity of biogeochemical interactions. If we can better understand the true depth of tidal marsh sediments, as well as how environmental factors may have impacted organic matter storage in the historic past, then we may be better able to predict how changing environmental conditions may alter carbon storage potential in the future. Now more than ever, it is essential to study the dynamics of these important blue carbon systems so that we can better approach tidal marsh management in the face of global climate change.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Carbon
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Ecology and Evolution
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_11251
PhysicalDescription
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InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vii, 55 pages)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-0p1v-3429
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Blum
GivenName
Julie
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2020-10-01 11:24:15
AssociatedEntity
Name
Julie Blum
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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ETD
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windows xp
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2020-11-06T19:41:41
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1.7
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