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Scavenging effects of dietary flavonoids on reactive dicaronyl species and their possible implications on the inhibition of the formation of advanced glycation-end products

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Scavenging effects of dietary flavonoids on reactive dicaronyl species and their possible implications on the inhibition of the formation of advanced glycation-end products
Identifier
ETD_2878
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056769
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Food Science
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Flavonoids--Therapeutic use
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Diabetes--Complications
Abstract (type = abstract)
Flavonoids are ubiquitous in nature and many of which occur in fruits, vegetables and beverages. According to chemical structure, flavonoids can be categorized into flavonols, flavones, flavanones, isoflavones, flavanols, anthocyanidins and chalcones. The flavonoids have aroused considerable interest recently because of their potential health benefits. They have been reported to reduce the risk of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, asthma, and diabetes. The objects of this study are to elucidate the structure-activity of dietary flavonoids to trap dicarbonyl species (e.g., glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MGO)), which are the precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), as well as to study the possible implications on the inhibition of the formation of AGEs by flavonoids. Previous studies have demonstrated that accumulation of reactive dicarbonyl compounds in human tissue will accelerate the vascular damage in both diabetes and uremia. Moreover, advanced glycation progressively and irreversibly modified proteins over time and yielded AGEs. AGEs are thought to contribute to the development of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Higher levels of α, β-dicarbonyl compounds were observed in diabetes patients’ plasma than those in healthy people’s plasma. Therefore, decreasing the levels of dicarbonyl compounds and consequently inhibiting the formation of AGEs would be a useful approach to prevent the development of diabetic complications. In this dissertation, we found that polyphenols phloretin and phloridzin from could trap MGO rapidly under in vitro conditions (pH 7.4 buffer solution, 37 oC) to form carbonyl adducts of those two compounds. The mono-carbonyl adduct of phloridzin was purified through column chromatography and identified by 1H, 13C, and 2D NMR and MS analysis. To understand the structure requirements of flavonoids to perform good trapping effects of reactive dicarbonyl compounds, we tested the trapping efficacy of flavonoids with different A-ring, B-ring, and C-ring configuration under in vitro conditions. Genistein, phloretin, and phloridzin were tested under an AGEs condition and all three flavonoids exhibited strong inhibitory effects on the formation AGEs. Two reaction adducts of genistein under such condition were observed using LC/MS, which further confirmed that flavonoids have the ability to prevent the formation of AGEs through trapping of dicarbonyl species.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xiii, 68 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Xi Shao
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shao
NamePart (type = given)
Xi
NamePart (type = date)
1983-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
xi shao
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
HO
NamePart (type = given)
CHI-TANG
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
CHI-TANG HO
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sang
NamePart (type = given)
Shengmin
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
co-chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Shengmin Sang
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Yang
NamePart (type = given)
Chung S.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Chung S. Yang
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
HUANG
NamePart (type = given)
MOU-TUAN
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
MOU-TUAN HUANG
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3WD408D
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
shao
GivenName
xi
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-09-20 11:08:44
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
xi shao
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
1423360
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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