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Influence of odor intensity and mood on hedonic reactions to aroma compounds in a multi-ethnic sample of young adults

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TitleInfo
Title
Influence of odor intensity and mood on hedonic reactions to aroma compounds in a multi-ethnic sample of young adults
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jin
NamePart (type = given)
Lumeng
NamePart (type = date)
1990-
DisplayForm
Lumeng Jin
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Tepper
NamePart (type = given)
Beverly J.
DisplayForm
Beverly J. Tepper
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Quadro
NamePart (type = given)
Loredana
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Loredana Quadro
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Schaffner
NamePart (type = given)
Donald
DisplayForm
Donald Schaffner
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Simon
NamePart (type = given)
James E.
DisplayForm
James E. Simon
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Haviland-Jones
NamePart (type = given)
Jeannette
DisplayForm
Jeannette Haviland-Jones
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This study was designed to investigate: 1) how nasal irritation influences the sensory perception of aromas; 2) the role of emotions in the preference and acceptance of aroma compounds; and 3) if ethnicity and genetic variation in taste sensitivity to the bitter compound 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) influence these outcomes. Ninety-six subjects (East Asian, n=53 and American Caucasians, n=43) were classified as PROP super-tasters; medium-tasters; and non-tasters. Subjects sniffed (orthonasally) aqueous solutions of cinnamaldehyde, methyl cinnamate, citral, citronellol, geraniol, and phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA) at low (range =1-2.5 ppm) and mid-range (range =4-100ppm) concentrations in two separate sessions. Subjects rated intensity and overall liking for each aroma using 15-cm line scales. Pungency was rated for the mid-range concentrations only. Self-reported mood reactions to all aromas were collected using 8-point VAS scales. Additionally, subjects selected the most related mood descriptor of each aroma as an implicit measurement. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, multiple linear regression, and principal component analysis (PCA). Nasal pungency contributed to intensity perception, however, pungency and intensity did not influence aroma liking. Liking of cinnamaldehyde and citral increased with increasing concentration (p=0.05-0.003), but concentration did not influence liking of the other aromas. At mid-range concentration, East Asians liked cinnamaldehyde less than American Caucasians. PROP did not influence liking alone, however, East Asian subjects liked cinnamaldehyde less with increasing sensitivity to PROP, as expected. Positive mood (the mean of happy and excited VAS ratings) was associated with greater liking of most of the samples (p<0.002 for all). In multiple regression, positive mood predicted liking of cinnamaldehyde, methyl cinnamate, citral, and PEA at both concentrations (R2=0.27-0.45, p<0.0001 for all). PCA characterized the aromas by associating each with the sensory properties and mood(s) it elicited: PEA was associated with calm/relaxed mood and methyl cinnamate with negative moods (especially anxious/worried) at both concentrations; the most pungent aroma, cinnamaldehyde, was associated with exciting/energized at mid-range concentration. These data suggest that aromas eliciting positive moods were liked better. Also, differences in liking of cinnamaldehyde between ethnic groups could reflect cultural and PROP-related variability in the pleasantness of this aroma.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Food Science
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6132
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (x, 94 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Odors--Psychological aspects
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Taste--Physiological aspects
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Smell
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Lumeng Jin
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3WH2RQM
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Jin
GivenName
Lumeng
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-01-02 05:47:32
AssociatedEntity
Name
Lumeng Jin
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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ContentModel
ETD
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windows xp
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